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Handshake
Protocol

Handshake

Protocol

Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root DNS naming zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities and naming systems.

Coin Details
Ticker:
HNS
Algorithm
Blake2b + SHA-3
Consensus
Proof of Work
Open Source
Yes
Explorers:
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Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root DNS naming zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities and naming systems.
Names on the internet (top level domains, social networking handles, etc.) ultimately rely upon centralized actors with full control over a system which are relied upon to be honest, as they are vulnerable to hacking, censorship, and corruption. Handshake aims to experiment with new ways the internet can be more secure, resilient, and socially useful with a peer-to-peer system validated by the network's participants.


The Handshake Protocol
By running Handshake, one can participate in a decentralized open naming platform secured by a decentralized peer-to-peer network.

  • A base layer for the decentralized internet. The internet is arranged in layers, to decentralize the internet, we need to start at the lowest layers of the stack. Secure naming ensures user agents are talking to the right endpoints.
  • The place for minimal global consensus. Decentralization is most successful if we have minimal areas to reach complete global agreement. Names and signing certificates may be one of the few (if only) places of global agreement for a decentralized web. Handshake is an experimental structure for reaching that agreement via software.
  • True Decentralization, no official singular Foundation, Committee, Corporation, or entities in permanent unitary control of the protocol.
  • Economic incentives enable decentralized agreements to form via a transparent name auction process. Without some kind of economic cost function, one person could register all names. Economic incentives enable decentralized sybil resistance which would otherwise be centralized and corrupted.
  • Alternative to certificate authorities, using a decentralized trust anchor to prove domain ownership
  • Distributed and permissionless zone file to which any participant has the right to add an entry or serve as host and validator
  • Light clients via merkelized proofs and proof-of-work allow for lightweight name resolutions and certificates. The initial protocol enables cryptographic name proofs, with the potential for decentralized proof lookups to be usually within the MTU limit.
  • A platform for sybil resilience. WoT can/should be used as an augmentation, but it is often not a global agreement of resources for individual decentralized services. By using Handshake names, one can know that some kind of economic limits exist for the use of the name. This can be leveraged whenever one is concerned about resource exhaustion, and reaching global agreement on moderation alone is too costly.

Internet Name Transfers Using Coins to Prevent Sybil Attacks

Handshake is a piece of software (and a loose consensus on agreement of the software itself). This software's primary function is for people to come to agreement on names and cryptographic keys authorized to represent that names in a decentralized way. To do this in a decentralized way, we need to prevent a single party from claiming all the names. Therefore, a unit of account is needed to prevent that single party from claiming all names.

Handshake uses a coin system for name registration. The Handshake coin (HNS) is the mechanism by which participants transfer, register, and update internet names. The community will be able to initiate auctions and place bids for top-level domains using HNS or trade their HNS as they see fit, with differing value per name.

Therefore, Handshake allocates the majority of its initial coins towards the FOSS community with absolutely no obligation attached, as it is this community most relevant with decentralized software and tools. The goal of the initial design was to account for all possible stakeholders. More info.

Handshake's incentive design assumptions relies upon Metcalfe's Law (Beckstrom's Law, etc.). While Bitcoin's value is derived from it being a costly store of value, Handshake's value is derived from its network of users. Metcalfe's Law asserts that an increase in userbase increases the value of the network (sub)exponentially. This means that allocation of value to potential developers and users of this system be a benefit to everyone, with network effect derived benefiting all users.

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Protocol

Handshake

Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root DNS naming zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities and naming systems.

Coin Details
Ticker:
HNS
Algorithm
Blake2b + SHA-3
Consensus
Proof of Work
Open Source
Yes
Explorers:

Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root DNS naming zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities and naming systems.
Names on the internet (top level domains, social networking handles, etc.) ultimately rely upon centralized actors with full control over a system which are relied upon to be honest, as they are vulnerable to hacking, censorship, and corruption. Handshake aims to experiment with new ways the internet can be more secure, resilient, and socially useful with a peer-to-peer system validated by the network's participants.


The Handshake Protocol
By running Handshake, one can participate in a decentralized open naming platform secured by a decentralized peer-to-peer network.

  • A base layer for the decentralized internet. The internet is arranged in layers, to decentralize the internet, we need to start at the lowest layers of the stack. Secure naming ensures user agents are talking to the right endpoints.
  • The place for minimal global consensus. Decentralization is most successful if we have minimal areas to reach complete global agreement. Names and signing certificates may be one of the few (if only) places of global agreement for a decentralized web. Handshake is an experimental structure for reaching that agreement via software.
  • True Decentralization, no official singular Foundation, Committee, Corporation, or entities in permanent unitary control of the protocol.
  • Economic incentives enable decentralized agreements to form via a transparent name auction process. Without some kind of economic cost function, one person could register all names. Economic incentives enable decentralized sybil resistance which would otherwise be centralized and corrupted.
  • Alternative to certificate authorities, using a decentralized trust anchor to prove domain ownership
  • Distributed and permissionless zone file to which any participant has the right to add an entry or serve as host and validator
  • Light clients via merkelized proofs and proof-of-work allow for lightweight name resolutions and certificates. The initial protocol enables cryptographic name proofs, with the potential for decentralized proof lookups to be usually within the MTU limit.
  • A platform for sybil resilience. WoT can/should be used as an augmentation, but it is often not a global agreement of resources for individual decentralized services. By using Handshake names, one can know that some kind of economic limits exist for the use of the name. This can be leveraged whenever one is concerned about resource exhaustion, and reaching global agreement on moderation alone is too costly.

Internet Name Transfers Using Coins to Prevent Sybil Attacks

Handshake is a piece of software (and a loose consensus on agreement of the software itself). This software's primary function is for people to come to agreement on names and cryptographic keys authorized to represent that names in a decentralized way. To do this in a decentralized way, we need to prevent a single party from claiming all the names. Therefore, a unit of account is needed to prevent that single party from claiming all names.

Handshake uses a coin system for name registration. The Handshake coin (HNS) is the mechanism by which participants transfer, register, and update internet names. The community will be able to initiate auctions and place bids for top-level domains using HNS or trade their HNS as they see fit, with differing value per name.

Therefore, Handshake allocates the majority of its initial coins towards the FOSS community with absolutely no obligation attached, as it is this community most relevant with decentralized software and tools. The goal of the initial design was to account for all possible stakeholders. More info.

Handshake's incentive design assumptions relies upon Metcalfe's Law (Beckstrom's Law, etc.). While Bitcoin's value is derived from it being a costly store of value, Handshake's value is derived from its network of users. Metcalfe's Law asserts that an increase in userbase increases the value of the network (sub)exponentially. This means that allocation of value to potential developers and users of this system be a benefit to everyone, with network effect derived benefiting all users.

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